Tel: 0191 2755019 / 07754 937 341

 Email: info@mikebelltherapy.com


Office G.04

Quayside-i4

Ouseburn Building

Albion Row

Newcastle upon Tyne

NE6 1LL


Appointments are available Monday to Saturday 8am-8pm

Home Home My Qualifications Testimonials Articles Fees Contact Me

Altius SEO Website

Home

PREMIER THERAPY CLINIC IN NEWCASTLE

Home My Qualifications Testimonials Articles Fees Contact Me
Therapy Hypnotherapy Weight Loss Depression Self Confidence Life Coaching Anxiety Disorders Panic Attacks GAD PTSD Social Anxiety Stop Smoking Phobia Release Habits / Addictions

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)


Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder caused by very stressful, frightening or distressing events.


Someone with PTSD often relives the traumatic event through nightmares and flashbacks, and may experience feelings of isolation, irritability and guilt.


They may also have problems sleeping, such as insomnia, and find concentrating difficult.


These symptoms are often severe and persistent enough to have a significant impact on the person’s day-to-day life.


The symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can have a significant impact on your day-to-day life.


In most cases, the symptoms develop during the first month after a traumatic event. However, in a minority of cases, there may be a delay of months or even years before symptoms start to appear.


Some people with PTSD experience long periods when their symptoms are less noticeable, followed by periods where they get worse. Other people have constant, severe symptoms.


The specific symptoms of PTSD can vary widely between individuals, but generally fall into the categories described below.


Re-experiencing

Re-experiencing is the most typical symptom of PTSD. This is when a person involuntarily and vividly re-lives the traumatic event in the form of:

flashbacks

nightmares

repetitive and distressing images or sensations

physical sensations – such as pain, sweating, nausea or trembling

Some people have constant negative thoughts about their experience, repeatedly asking themselves questions that prevent them from coming to terms with the event.

For example, they may wonder why the event happened to them and if they could have done anything to stop it, which can lead to feelings of guilt or shame.


Avoidance and emotional numbing

Trying to avoid being reminded of the traumatic event is another key symptom of PTSD. This usually means avoiding certain people or places that remind you of the trauma, or avoiding talking to anyone about your experience. Many people with PTSD try to push memories of the event out of their mind, often distracting themselves with work or hobbies.


Some people attempt to deal with their feelings by trying not to feel anything at all. This is known as emotional numbing. This can lead to the person becoming isolated and withdrawn, and they may also give up pursuing activities they used to enjoy.


Hyperarousal (feeling 'on edge')

Someone with PTSD may be very anxious and find it difficult to relax. They may be constantly aware of threats and easily startled. This state of mind is known as hyperarousal.


Hyperarousal often leads to:


irritability

angry outbursts

sleeping problems

difficulty concentrating


Other problems

Many people with PTSD also have a number of other problems, including:


other mental health problems – such as depression, anxiety or phobias

self-harming or destructive behaviour – such as drug misuse or alcohol misuse

other physical symptoms – such as headaches, dizziness, chest pains and stomach aches

PTSD sometimes leads to work-related problems and the breakdown of relationships.


Causes of PTSD

The type of events that can cause PTSD include:


serious road accidents

violent personal assaults, such as sexual assault, mugging or robbery

prolonged sexual abuse, violence or severe neglect

witnessing violent deaths

military combat

being held hostage

terrorist attacks

natural disasters, such as severe floods, earthquakes or tsunamis

PTSD can develop immediately after someone experiences a disturbing event or it can occur weeks, months or even years later.


PTSD is estimated to affect about 1 in every 3 people who have a traumatic experience, but it's not clear exactly why some people develop the condition and others don't.


Complex PTSD

People who repeatedly experience traumatic situations such as severe neglect, abuse or violence may be diagnosed with complex PTSD.


Complex PTSD can cause similar symptoms to PTSD and may not develop until years after the event. It's often more severe if the trauma was experienced early in life as this can affect a child's development.